By 2.2 min readCategories: Emotions, Health, Well-beingPublished On: 21 November 2021

Emotional Health is the resilience and ability to navigate the little worries, frustrations, doubts, sadness or guilt that you experience in your daily life. We can be emotionally healthy when we are emotionally intelligent.

Did you know that your Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is a bigger determining factor of resilience and success in life than your IQ? Emotional Intelligence has been identified as one of the top skills for the 21st Century by the World Economic Forum.

What is EQ anyway? Fundamentally, it’s the ability to notice your emotions, identify what you’re feeling, to feel what you’re feeling so you can navigate through the experience. To be able to share your feelings so others can understand you.

If, as soon as you start to feel bad or uncomfortable you start to turn it off or shut the feelings down, you’re not allowing yourself to understand what specific emotion(s) you’re experiencing. Do you often use words like stressed, anxious, bad, good, fine or okay to describe how you feel? Once you take the time to understand the nuances of your experience, the specific emotions that you’re feeling, you can then start to use your emotions as your guideposts, rather than something to manage or control.

Research is showing that being able to put your emotions into words with some specificity helps to not only feel better but also to build resilience.

A study found that individuals who were able to recount a difficult situation in a journal and precisely pinpoint the emotions that arose seemed to experience less stress and coped better, compared to those who were less able to be specific and differentiate their emotional responses.

Developing emotional intelligence skills is so much easier than being overwhelmed by emotions you cannot identify, understand or manage.

EQ leads to greater self-integration, which allows more empathy for others’ emotions, deepening connection and social interactions. Being emotionally intelligent leads to resilience, and includes:

  • Understanding your emotions
  • Understanding the purpose of your emotion(s)
  • Being able to share with others how you are feeling so you can be understood
  • Knowing the importance of reaching out for support
  • Calling a friend or loved one rather than withdrawing or isolating
  • Allowing your emotions to be expressed and heard.

𝘍𝘰𝘳 𝘦𝘹𝘢𝘮𝘱𝘭𝘦, 𝘵𝘸𝘰 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘢𝘮𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘨𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵. 𝘐𝘧 𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘪𝘴 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘥, 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘰𝘥, 𝘴𝘶𝘱𝘱𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘰𝘸𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘨𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘤𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘳𝘦𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘱𝘩𝘺𝘴𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘱𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘸𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘨𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘰𝘭𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯. 𝘐𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦’𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘪𝘵, 𝘪𝘵’𝘴 𝘨𝘰𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘪𝘵, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱 𝘪𝘯 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘢𝘺𝘴.

Journalling tip: as you write, use an emotion wheel or emotions list to pinpoint your thoughts and feelings.

If you use EFT tapping, nuanced emotional vocabulary really helps to get specific! Use an emotion wheel or emotions list the next time you create your Setup Statement and notice what’s different.

Not sure what it means to use your emotions as guideposts? Consider attending this short workshop on Emotional Intelligence and EFT.

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